The Claritin® Allergen Guide: Tree Pollen Edition

Outdoor allergens like seasonal pollens and molds can be difficult to manage because it seems like they’re everywhere and you can’t escape them. Many of them occur at the time you want to be able to enjoy the outdoors, too- like right now! Here’s a closer look at a common culprit, tree pollen. Knowing what to look for can help you steer clear of these notorious allergy triggers:

Tree Pollens
When it comes to trees, the real allergy troublemakers are hardwood deciduous trees — oak, elm, birch, maple, ash, alder and hazel:

  • These trees generally pollinate from February to April or May.
  • In the South, these trees begin pollinating as early as January; in the North, they begin in April.
  • People show cross-reactivity to trees in the beech, birch, alder and oak family, and in the juniper and cedar family. This means that if you’re allergic to one type of tree, you’re likely allergic to others in the same family.
  • If you’re looking to plant trees on your property, look for species that do not aggravate allergies, such as catalpa, crepe myrtle, dogwood, fig, fir, palm, pear, plum, redbud and redwood trees.

About the author
Mrs. Hatland is a 30-something married, mom of 7 and the face behind the popular online publication, Motherhood Defined. Known as the Iowa Mom blogger by her local peers and “The Fairy Blogmother” worldwide. She has professional experience in working closely with clients on brand ambassadorships, client outreach services, content creation and creative social media advertising exposure.

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